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League City, Texas facts for kids

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League City, Texas
City
City of League City
Location in Galveston county and  in the state of Texas
Location in Galveston county and in the state of Texas
Country United StatesUnited States
State TexasTexas
Counties Galveston
Area
 • Total 137.3 km2 (53.0 sq mi)
 • Land 132.8 km2 (51.3 sq mi)
 • Water 4.4 km2 (1.7 sq mi)
Elevation 6 m (20 ft)
Population (2015)
 • Total 98,312
 • Density 716.04/km2 (1,854.5/sq mi)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 77573-77574
Area code(s) 281/346/713/832
FIPS code 48-41980
GNIS feature ID 1339753
Website http://www.leaguecity.com

League City is a city in the U.S. state of Texas, within Houston–The Woodlands–Sugar Land metropolitan area. The city is in the county of Galveston As of the 2010 census, League City's population was 83,560, up from 45,444 at the 2000 census. The city has a small portion north of Clear Creek within Harris County zoned for residential and commercial uses.

League City is home to several waterside resorts popular with residents of nearby Houston.

League City surpassed Galveston as Galveston County's largest city between 2000 and 2005.

History

League City was settled at the former site of a Karankawa Indian village. Three families, the Butlers, Cowarts, and Perkinses, are considered to be founding families of the city. The Cowart family settled on a creek now called Cowart's Creek after them (now often called "Coward's Creek"). The Perkins family built on a creek notably lined with magnolia trees, and named it Magnolia Bayou. The Butler family settled inland.

The first resident of the town proper, George W. Butler, arrived from Louisiana in 1873 and settled at the junction of Clear Creek and Chigger Bayou. The area was known as Butler's Ranch or Clear Creek until J. C. League acquired the land from a man named Muldoon on his entering the priesthood. League laid out his town site along the Galveston, Houston, and Henderson Railroad, already established in the area. This began a small feud over the name, as Butler was the postmaster. The name was changed several times, alternating between Clear Creek and the new League City. In the end, League City was chosen.

In 1907, League had two railroad flatcars of live oak trees left by the railroad tracks. These were for the residents to plant on their property. Butler and his son Milby supervised the planting of these trees, now known as the Butler Oaks. Many of them line Main Street to this day.

In the 2000s, rising real estate costs in Galveston forced many families to move to other areas, including League City. This meant an influx of children out of Galveston ISD and into other school districts like Clear Creek ISD and Dickinson ISD.

In July 2013 the financial website NerdWallet named League City the best city in Texas for people looking for jobs.

Geography

LeagueCityTXMap
Map of League City

League City is located at 29°29′59″N 95°05′23″W / 29.499797°N 95.089784°W / 29.499797; -95.089784 (29.499797, −95.089784). This is 23 miles (37 km) southeast of Houston, and the same distance northwest of Galveston.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 53.0 square miles (137.3 km2), of which 51.3 square miles (132.8 km2) is land and 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2), or 3.22%, is water.

Climate

Climate data for League City, Texas
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 86
(30)
82
(27.8)
86
(30)
96
(35.6)
93
(33.9)
96
(35.6)
100
(37.8)
96
(35.6)
93
(33.9)
91
(32.8)
80
(26.7)
82
(27.8)
100
(37.8)
Average high °F (°C) 64
(17.8)
66
(18.9)
71
(21.7)
80
(26.7)
85
(29.4)
90
(32.2)
91
(32.8)
91
(32.8)
86
(30)
82
(27.8)
65
(18.3)
63
(17.2)
77.8
(25.46)
Average low °F (°C) 42
(5.6)
48
(8.9)
52
(11.1)
62
(16.7)
66
(18.9)
76
(24.4)
76
(24.4)
78
(25.6)
74
(23.3)
66
(18.9)
51
(10.6)
45
(7.2)
61.3
(16.3)
Record low °F (°C) 26
(-3.3)
32
(0)
28
(-2.2)
42
(5.6)
53
(11.7)
69
(20.6)
71
(21.7)
73
(22.8)
66
(18.9)
57
(13.9)
33
(0.6)
33
(0.6)
26
(-3.3)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.90
(99.1)
3.03
(77)
2.77
(70.4)
2.80
(71.1)
3.64
(92.5)
6.23
(158.2)
5.28
(134.1)
5.26
(133.6)
6.88
(174.8)
5.66
(143.8)
4.43
(112.5)
3.69
(93.7)
53.57
(1,360.7)
Source: Weather Underground

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1970 10,818
1980 16,578 53.2%
1990 30,159 81.9%
2000 45,444 50.7%
2010 83,560 83.9%
Est. 2015 98,312 17.7%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 83,560 people, 30,192 households, and 22,544 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,596 people per square mile (616.2/km2). There were 32,119 housing units at an average density of 627.3 per square mile (241.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 79.5% White, 7.1% Black or African American, 0.4% Native American, 5.4% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 4.7% some other race, and 2.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.3% of the population.

There were 30,192 households out of which 40.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.3% were headed by married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 3.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the city, the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34.5 years. For every 100 females there were 96.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.4 males.

According to the 2007 American Community Survey estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $78,250, and the median income for a family was $88,338.[1] Males had a median income of $52,366 versus $34,301 for females. The per capita income for the city was $27,170. About 3.6% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Houston Gulf Airport was located in eastern League City. The airport's land was sold and the land became a string of houses along Texas State Highway 96.

Commercial airline service for the area is operated from George Bush Intercontinental Airport and William P. Hobby Airport, which are located in Houston. League City in conjunction with Island Transit, Connect Transit, and UTMB, there is now a Park and Ride in the Victory Lakes subdivision.

Parks and recreation

The 38,000-square-foot (3,500 m2) Perry Family YMCA is located at 1701 League City Parkway. The branch, which cost $10.7 million U.S. dollars to build was named after Bob Perry, a homebuilder who donated $1 million. The North Galveston County YMCA began in 1993 and later moved into the Perry YMCA. John P. McGovern and his wife, Katherine, donated the 17-acre (69,000 m2) site used for the Perry YMCA.

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