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Lower Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Lower Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lower
Owen Coachman House
Owen Coachman House
Nickname(s): "Home of the Best Sunsets"
Lower Township highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Lower Township highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lower Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lower Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Cape May
Established April 2, 1723 (as precinct)
Incorporated February 21, 1798 (as township)
Area
 • Total 31.015 sq mi (80.327 km2)
 • Land 27.740 sq mi (71.846 km2)
 • Water 3.275 sq mi (8.482 km2)  10.56%
Area rank 85th of 566 in state
4th of 16 in county
Elevation 20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 22,866
 • Estimate (2015) 22,125
 • Rank 110th of 566 in state
1st of 16 in county
 • Density 824.3/sq mi (318.3/km2)
 • Density rank 404th of 566 in state
10th of 16 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08251 - Villas
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 884, 886, 889, 898
FIPS code 3400941610
GNIS feature ID 0882044

Lower Township is a township in Cape May County, New Jersey, United States. It is part of the Ocean City Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 22,866, reflecting a decrease of 79 (-0.3%) from the 22,945 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,125 (+10.2%) from the 20,820 counted in the 1990 Census.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Lower Township as its 34th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

History

Lower Township was formed as a precinct on April 2, 1723, and was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships established by the Township Act of 1798.

Portions of the township were taken to form Cape Island Borough (March 8, 1848, now known as Cape May city), Cape May Point borough (created April 19, 1878, restored to Lower Township on April 8, 1896, recreated April 6, 1908), Holly Beach (April 14, 1885, now part of Wildwood city), South Cape May (August 27, 1894; restored to Lower Township after the borough was dissolved on April 30, 1945), Wildwood Crest (April 6, 1910) and North Cape May (March 19, 1928; restored to Lower Township after it was dissolved on April 30, 1945). The township's name came from its location when Cape May was split into three townships in 1723 at the same time that Middle Township and Upper Township were created.

Geography

Lower Cape Branch Library NJ
Cape May County Library branch on Bayshore Road

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.015 square miles (80.327 km2), including 27.740 square miles (71.846 km2) of land and 3.275 square miles (8.482 km2) of water (10.56%).

Diamond Beach (2010 Census population of 136), Erma (2,134), North Cape May (3,226) and Villas (9,483) are unincorporated communities and census-designated places (CDPs) located within Lower Township. Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bennett, Cold Spring, Cold Spring Inlet, Ephraims Island, Fishing Creek, Higbees Landing, Miami Beach, Schellingers Landing, Sewells Point, South Cape May, Sunset Beach, Town Bank, Weers Landing and Wildwood Gables.

Lower Township borders Middle Township, Wildwood City, Wildwood Crest Borough, Cape May City, West Cape May Borough, Cape May Point Borough, the Delaware Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 862
1820 1,001 16.1%
1830 999 −0.2%
1840 1,133 13.4%
1850 1,604 * 41.6%
1860 1,865 16.3%
1870 1,783 −4.4%
1880 1,779 * −0.2%
1890 1,156 * −35.0%
1900 1,141 * −1.3%
1910 1,188 * 4.1%
1920 1,096 −7.7%
1930 1,444 * 31.8%
1940 1,693 17.2%
1950 2,737 61.7%
1960 6,332 131.3%
1970 10,154 60.4%
1980 17,105 68.5%
1990 20,820 21.7%
2000 22,945 10.2%
2010 22,866 −0.3%
Est. 2015 22,125 −3.2%
Population sources: 1810-2000
1810-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 22,866 people, 9,579 households, and 6,351 families residing in the township. The population density was 824.3 per square mile (318.3/km2). There were 14,507 housing units at an average density of 523.0 per square mile (201.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 94.24% (21,549) White, 1.99% (456) Black or African American, 0.16% (37) Native American, 0.62% (142) Asian, 0.04% (10) Pacific Islander, 1.20% (275) from other races, and 1.74% (397) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.24% (969) of the population.

There were 9,579 households out of which 22.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.7% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the township, the population was spread out with 19.8% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 20.4% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 21.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.5 years. For every 100 females there were 90.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 86.9 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $51,101 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,460) and the median family income was $62,587 (+/- $7,438). Males had a median income of $50,572 (+/- $3,361) versus $35,978 (+/- $2,297) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,175 (+/- $1,295). About 6.6% of families and 10.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.4% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 22,945 people, 9,328 households, and 6,380 families residing in the township. The population density was 813.0 people per square mile (313.9/km²). There were 13,924 housing units at an average density of 493.4 per square mile (190.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.26% White, 1.39% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.88% of the population.

There were 9,328 households out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.9% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.6% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the township the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 20.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.2 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $38,977, and the median income for a family was $45,058. Males had a median income of $35,201 versus $24,715 for females. The per capita income for the township was $19,786. About 5.3% of families and 7.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.3% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

CMLF-CMTerminal
The Cape May terminal of the Cape May-Lewes Ferry

Mile marker 0 of the Garden State Parkway is in Lower Township, at the intersection with Route 109. U.S. Route 9 passes through the township, as do Route 109, Route 162 and Ocean Drive.

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 179.10 miles (288.23 km) of roadways, of which 131.92 miles (212.30 km) were maintained by the municipality, 33.83 miles (54.44 km) by Cape May County and 6.87 miles (11.06 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 6.48 miles (10.43 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

NJ Transit offers bus service on the 313 and 315 routes between Cape May / Wildwood / Philadelphia, on the 552 between Cape May and Atlantic City, with seasonal service on the 319 route serving shore points between Cape May and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City's Midtown Manhattan.

The Cape May-Lewes Ferry terminal is located in North Cape May. Operated by the Delaware River and Bay Authority, the ferry makes the 17-mile (27 km) trip between Lower Township and Lewes, Delaware in 85 minutes, carrying passengers and vehicles. The Delaware River and Bay Authority operates a shuttle bus service that connects the ferry terminal with the Cape May Transportation Center in Cape May in the summer months and to the Cape May County Park & Zoo in July and August.

Points of interest

Cold Spring Presby
Cold Spring Presbyterian Church
  • Battery 223
  • Cape May Lighthouse
  • Cape May Winery & Vineyard
  • Owen Coachman House
  • Cold Spring Grange Hall
  • Cold Spring Presbyterian Church
  • Fire Control Tower No. 23
  • Fishing Creek Schoolhouse
  • George Hildreth House
  • Hawk Haven Vineyard & Winery
  • Jonathan Pyne House
  • Naval Air Station Wildwood Aviation Museum
  • Rio Grande Station
  • Turdo Vineyards & Winery

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